News

  • NZIER Consensus Forecasts show stronger near-term growth

    14 December 2020

    The latest NZIER Consensus Forecasts show a substantial upward revision to growth forecasts over the coming year. The consensus is clearly for a ‘V’ shaped economy recovery in New Zealand.

    Read the release here.

  • 2020 Summer Reading List for the Prime Minister

    01 December 2020

    Today the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research Incorporated (NZIER) has released its 2020 Summer Reading List for the Prime Minister.

    “NZIER supports New Zealanders reading, taking time to think long thoughts, and discussing them. Summer is good for that” said NZIER’s Chief Executive Laurence Kubiak.

    The list was prepared as part of the NZIER Public Good programme, which undertakes economic research and thinking aimed at promoting a better understanding of New Zealand’s important economic challenges.

    Read more here.

  • Unprecedented stimulus supports a V-shaped recovery for the New Zealand economy - NZIER Quarterly Predictions, December 2020

    24 November 2020

    Recent developments point to a strong rebound in economic activity, as the New Zealand economy responds to the unprecedented amount of stimulus measures implemented by the Government and Reserve Bank. NZIER forecasts annual average GDP growth to rise to around 5 percent by early 2022, before moderating to average around 3 percent in the subsequent years.

    Quarterly Predictions is an independent review of New Zealand’s economic outlook and includes comprehensive forecasts of the economy. The full publication is available exclusively to NZIER’s members. Read the media release here.

  • An inclusive growth agenda for the next generation

    24 November 2020

    A newly released report from the Helen Clark Foundation and the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research calls for a minimum wage boost to improve inclusion and incentivise investment in capital and skills, leading to greater productivity. Read the report here.

  • NZIER’s Shadow Board sees less need for further stimulus

    09 November 2020

    We are continuing to seek our Shadow Board members’ views on whether the Official Cash Rate (OCR) should be negative and if the Reserve Bank should expand its quantitative easing (QE). Board members once again saw a reduced need for a negative OCR and further QE over the coming year. Read the full release here.

  • NZIER's QSBO shows business confidence improving as demand lifts

    20 October 2020

    The latest NZIER Quarterly Survey of Business Opinion (QSBO) shows business confidence has improved, reflecting a pick-up in demand over the September quarter.

    A net 1 percent of businesses reported an increase in own trading activity – a turnaround from the net 37 percent reporting a decline in the previous quarter. This result supports our expectations of a V-shaped recovery in economic activity, as the New Zealand economy responds to the unprecedented amount of stimulus measures implemented by the Government and Reserve Bank.

    Read the media release here.

    QSBO is available to NZIER members only.

  • Inflexibility a challenge for the agrifood sector - NZIER Insight 93

    06 October 2020

    COVID-19 has proved challenging for the agri-food sector. From pasture to plate, farms and businesses in the agri-food sector have reported feeling squeezed between rising costs and lower prices.

    To explore the impacts of COVID-19 on the agri-food sector, NZIER collaborated with an Australia-New Zealand team, including AgResearch and The University of Queensland. NZIER led an online survey of farms and businesses across the two countries. 

    In this Insight we delve in to the survey responses from New Zealand. Comparative results are expected to be published later this year.

    Read the Insight here.

  • NZIER’s Shadow Board still favour QE over negative OCR for stimulus

    21 September 2020

    We are continuing to seek our Shadow Board members’ views on whether the Official Cash Rate (OCR) should be negative and if the Reserve Bank should expand its quantitative easing (QE).
    Fewer Board members see further quantitative easing as appropriate over the coming year. This follows the Reserve Bank’s decision to expand its Large-Scale Asset Purchases (LSAP) programme up to $100 billion at the August meeting.

    Read the full release here.

  • NZIER Consensus Forecasts show a wide range of forecasts - Consensus Forecasts, September 2020

    14 September 2020

    The latest NZIER Consensus Forecasts continues to show a wide range of forecasts for the economy, reflecting a large degree of uncertainty over the growth outlook. The announcement on 11 August of new COVID-19 cases in the community, and the subsequent return of Auckland to Alert Level 3 and the rest of New Zealand to Alert Level 2, has added to the uncertainty over how the economic recovery will pan out over the coming years. The most optimistic forecast for the New Zealand economy is a decline in GDP of 5 percent on average for the year to March 2021, while the most pessimistic is a decline of 11.8 percent.

    Read the release here.

  • NZIER partners with ERIA in an IRC study of ASEAN countries as well as New Zealand

    10 September 2020

    NZIER has partnered with ERIA, in a comparative study of international regulatory cooperation in all ASEAN countries as well as New Zealand. The finding of the research can be found here: https://www.eria.org/publications/interconnected-government-international-regulatory-cooperation-in-asean/ 

    The research draws on a series of country reports which included case studies, interviews, and an elite survey of key decision-makers and opinion leaders in all ASEAN member states, as well as New Zealand.

    The key messages and policy implications can be found in an ERIA Policy Brief https://www.eria.org/publications/under-the-radar-international-regulatory-cooperation-in-asean-and-new-zealand/ 

    The implications specifically for New Zealand are discussed in NZIER Insight 92 Regulators are the new diplomats – the role of IRC in a post-COVID world.