Todd Krieble

Principal Economist

Biography

Todd has a wide ranging policy background, including interests in health, environment and cultural policy.

Todd has held senior management positions, responsible for policy advice, and other functions, in a number of government agencies. This has included roles in the Ministry of Health, Ministry for the Environment, Department of Labour and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage.

Todd worked in the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet’s Policy Advisory Group from 2004-2007. Todd chaired the Officials’ Social Policy Committee and led work on the establishment of national health targets.  He was seconded to the Office of Director General at the World Health Organisation in 2000 to work on agency reform.

Todd is a patron of the McGuinness Institute, a Wellington based non-partisan futures think tank.

Published article

Gault, P and T. Krieble. 2016. Do Citizens and Communities Have the News and Information they Need and Want in a Digital Age? Policy Quarterly Vol. 12, iss. 2 article link.

Todd has a passion for strategy and improving the quality of decision-making. He has a deep understanding of the inner workings of government and knows what types of analysis and arguments are required to persuade senior decision-makers about key policy issues.

Contact

  • DDI04 470 1812 
  • MOB027 742 6415 

Education

BSc │MPH │MPP

Recent projects

Latest publications

  • Pacific economic trends and snapshot 2016

    14 December 2016

    Pacific Economic Trends and Snapshot 2016 updates our 2013 Snapshot and provides new insights that can be used to inform policies, programmes and further research. This 2016 update includes new statistics on housing and Pasifika businesses.

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  • How would you spend a half-billion dollars on arts, culture and heritage? - NZIER Insight 58

    02 February 2016

    The government spends a half billion dollars on arts, culture and heritage each year but has little indication of what the public actually wants from public expenditure. At present mainly ‘experts’ decide what cultural goods and services should be supplied from the public purse.

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